Curtiss Wright

01/03/2015 3 albums Share: , , Album RSS
Curtiss-Wright came into existence on July 5, 1929, the result of a merger of 12 companies associated with Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company of Buffalo, New York, and Wright Aeronautical of Dayton, Ohio, and was headquartered in Buffalo, New York. Its most visible success came with the P-40, variously known as the Tomahawk, Kittyhawk, and Warhawk, which were built between 1940 and 1944 at the main production facility in Buffalo. The Buffalo plant also produced 2,500 C-46s.

Curtiss-Wright failed to make the transition to design and production of jet aircraft, despite several attempts. During the war, the company hadn't invested as much as it should have in research and development, having to spend most of its resources keeping up with wartime production orders.

The final nail in the coffin was the choice of the Northrop F-89 Scorpion over the XF-87 Blackhawk; after the F-87 was cancelled October 10, 1948, Curtiss-Wright shut down its entire Aeroplane Division and sold the assets to North American Aviation. While this marked Curtiss-Wright's departure from preeminence in the aviation industry, one notable spin-off involved Curtiss-Wright's flight research laboratory, founded in 1943 near the main plant at the Buffalo airport.

Curtiss-Wright had several plants in the Buffalo area, including on Churchill St (opened 1915, closed 1930), 2050 Elmwood Ave (now a Home Depot and clothing store) opened in 1917, "plant 1"on Kenmore and Vulcan (now Western Electric), "plant 2" on Genesee St (sold to Westinghouse, now demolished), and the plant below, which I believe was a "special parts plant", but I'm not entirely sure.

The plant was purchased in mid 2015 by The Buffalo Urban Development Corp. The parcel is one of more than 11 BUDC has acquired in the past year as it is creating an urban business park that will mirror others developed by the city agency in recent years

10-30-09

10-30-09

25 images

6-8-11

6-8-11

22 images

3-30-14

3-30-14

13 images

No Comments

Add a comment:

*Required fields




Subscribe to comments RSS Feed